The Church Campus

Interior Photography By Lydia Wiltse
Exterior Photography By Kevin Dunegan

 

THE GATHERING SPACE

Gathering SpaceThis is really a hospitality center. In addition to gathering here before and after mass, this space is used for hospitality for grieving families at times of death, both for visitation and vigil services. We have a kitchenette behind the oak doors to serve refreshments during visitation, after daily mass, and for other gatherings. The “Creation” Wall Sculpture – On the east wall in the gathering space is an original sculpture by Stuart Nakamura of Seattle, Washington, based on the Creation story in Genesis.

Etched Glass WallThe Wall of Etched Glass — The wall between the gathering space and the worship space depicts the Red Rock Mountains of our area. It was designed by Jean Myers of Lake Tahoe, California. This wall separating the two areas allows the gathering space to be used by adults with crying infants. In this space, they can see and hear the liturgy.
The Daily ChapelThe Daily Chapel — This space can be changed with each season. The stained glass windows were designed by Jean Myers. This space has many uses including small weddings and funerals and visitation of the body before funerals. Families do not have to use a funeral home, but rather, everything takes place in “their” church home. The folding wall on the east side of this space opens to enlarge the space of the Daily Chapel for slightly larger weddings and funerals that would lose intimacy if they were in our large nave. The furniture is the same design as the nave, but on a smaller scale.
Welcome Center — We will be opening the Welcome Center in the gathering space in September. It will be staffed after weekend masses to answer any questions, offer information on ministries and registration.
THE NAVE OR WORSHIP SPACE

The desert colors that have been chosen for furnishing and décor reflect our environment. This space was designed not to be complete until the people are assembled for celebration.

FontBaptismal Font – All baptisms are celebrated within the liturgy and by immersion. The font resembles a tomb – where one enters and emerges in the new life of baptism. It is placed here so that we must pass by it and be reminded of our baptismal promise each time we enter our worship space.
Interior Facing EastFurniture – Our liturgical furniture was designed by Patricia Walsh, Liturgical Artist, of Oakland, CA. It was built by Don Barbeau, Wood World, of Las Vegas, NV. It is crafted of cherry wood with titanium metal inserts. Titanium is a metal native to Southern Nevada. The metal work on our furniture, our crosses, and the tabernacle was crafted by Florence Resnikoff of Oakland, CA.
Stained Glass– The windows in this space, designed by Jean Myers, represent the Triduum – Holy Thursday, Good Friday, Easter Vigil – the very special three days of our church year, but are also meant to be left to your own interpretation. The East Window represents Holy Thursday – focusing on community and reconciliation. The West Window suggests the death and resurrection struggle of Good Friday. The North Windows suggest the triumph of Easter – the resurrection we celebrate weekly in our lives.

East Window

West Window

North Window

North WallDoors on North Wall – The doors between the stained glass windows can be opened to reveal a rear projection screen. One of the uses is to view baptisms. The stained glass windows can also be covered by recessed doors that pull out, and the skylight can be closed off by an automated cover to darken the space for audio visual use.
AmbryAmbry for the Sacred Oils – Crafted from cherry wood with a grid of brass rods and strips. It contains three flasks of oil: Chrism – for Baptism, Confirmation, and Holy Orders; Oil of the Sick – used for anointing the sick; Oil of the catechumens – used for anointing catechumens before baptism.
Eucharistic ChapelEucharistic Chapel – The etched glass door depicts a Yucca, a sign of life in the desert as is the Eucharist. The tabernacle door is composed of three panes of electroplated copper attached to cherry wood. This chapel is open 24 hours, through an outside entrance, for private meditation and prayer.– All baptisms are celebrated within the liturgy and by immersion. The font resembles a tomb – where one enters and emerges in the new life of baptism. It is placed here so that we must pass by it and be reminded of our baptismal promise each time we enter our worship space.
Exterior ShotCourtyard Fountain – Do you know the significance of the fountain in our courtyard? On the top of our church building is a pyramid: a symbol of the Divine. The fountain is also a pyramid. That it is in the courtyard is a message that the Divine has come to our level, in the “marketplace,” in our midst! The sides of the fountain pyramid are of different heights, signifying that we are at different levels of relationship with God. The sides of the fountain pyramid are also separated from each other as a sign that we are sometimes “broken.” The water flowing in and around the fountain reminds us that by virtue of the waters of baptism we are united with God, no matter at what level we find our relationship with God, no matter how broken. Through baptism, we are one with God and with one another.